pregnancy

Role of gut microbiota studied in pregnant women with lupus

Role of gut microbiota studied in pregnant women with lupus

A new study shows that pregnancy and breastfeeding could change the way the body reacts to conventional lupus treatment in women due to imbalances in the gut bacterial community, or dysbiosis. The research was undertaken to understand the higher risk of severe flares and help women with lupus experience healthy pregnancies and successful outcomes, by improving therapeutic approaches.

Gene Changes Key to Successful Pregnancy in Lupus

Gene Changes Key to Successful Pregnancy in Lupus

Pregnant women with lupus are more likely to suffer complications than those who don’t. Lupus Research Alliance Scientific Advisory Board members Dr. Virginia Pascual, Professor at Weill Cornell Medicine; and Dr. Jane Salmon, Collette Kean Research Professor at Hospital for Special Surgery, and their colleagues asked if testing the blood, of pregnant women with lupus, using advanced technologies could identify, early in pregnancy, lupus patients at high risk for complications.

Researchers identify early indicators of pregnancy complications in lupus patients

Researchers identify early indicators of pregnancy complications in lupus patients

A study of pregnant women with systemic lupus erythematosus has identified early changes in the RNA molecules present in the blood that could be used to determine the likelihood of them developing preeclampsia.

The study, which is published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, may also help researchers develop treatments to prevent other pregnancy complications associated with lupus, including miscarriage and premature birth.