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The Art of Napping

The Art of Napping

Naps are not only beneficial because they make us feel less sleepy and more alert, but because they improve our cognitive functioning, reaction times, short-term memory and even our mood. Research also found that found that motor learning, which is where brain pathways change in response to learning a new skill, was significantly greater following a brief afternoon nap for regular nappers when compared to non-nappers.


If you have lupus you know all about napping, infact we’re professionals. So could we improve the quality of our napping? Here’s a few tips to get the best from your nap.

Coping with Christmas

Coping with Christmas

Some things that might trigger a flare: divorce, bereavement, virus and Christmas!! Yes Christmas, a wonderful but potentially very stressful time of year.

Lupus is unpredictable and can interfere with our lives, stopping us doing everything that we want to and that includes participating in Christmas celebrations.

So let’s look at a few Christmas hacks so you can participate in Christmas!

Celebrities speak and the World listens.

Celebrities speak and the World listens.

We live a celebrity obsessed world, just take a look at the number of followers they have on twitter/instagram etc to confirm this, when celebrities speak the world listens. If they wear something or do something all the followers sit up and take notice, hence so many brands want to use a celebrity to promote their products.

People follow the daily lives of these people and feel they know them as friends and so who better to give information about health, aren’t friends and family the people we turn to t ask for advice? Some celebrities promote only themselves and their brand, others have used their high profiles for good and to raise awareness of various causes and illnesses.

"I'm fine", our most common lie.

"I'm fine", our most common lie.

One of the things people say most often when they see you is ‘how are you’, an innocent enough question to most people, but when you have a chronic illness are they asking exactly how you are or just being polite? How many people want the full low down of how we’re actually feeling?

My stock answer, even with people I know well, is ‘Oh I’m fine thanks’ and I’d be pretty sure a lot of other people with chronic illnesses are saying the same thing. So why do we give this answer?

I told you I was sick – the long road to a diagnosis of lupus.

I told you I was sick – the long road to a diagnosis of lupus.

My story is on this website and if you’ve read it you will know that it took me over 4 years to get a diagnosis of lupus. In the end it was sheer luck that my GP got fed up of seeing me and referred me to a rheumatologist, who happened to be Professor David D’Cruz (a rheumatologist with a special interest in lupus, now at the Louise Coote Lupus Unit, London).