USA

Genetically engineered immune cells wipe out lupus in mice

Genetically engineered immune cells wipe out lupus in mice

Lupus can be a stubborn disease to treat. Although many struck by the autoimmune condition live relatively normal lives, some suffer from kidney failure, blood clots, and other complications that can be deadly. Now, scientists have found that a novel treatment that wipes out the immune system’s B cells cures mice of the condition. Though the work is preliminary, it has excited researchers because it uses a therapy already approved for people with blood cancer.

“This is a critical stepping stone,” says Jennifer Anolik, a rheumatologist who runs the lupus clinic at the University of Rochester Medical Center in New York who was not involved with the work.

Study Identifies Potential New Targets for Improving Heart Health in People with Lupus

Study Identifies Potential New Targets for Improving Heart Health in People with Lupus

People with lupus and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have a greater risk of developing cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and atherosclerosis. A new study conducted in Columbia has identified potential new therapeutic targets for reducing endothelial damage (defined as the destruction of the membrane that lines the inside of the heart and blood vessels).

Kidney transplant boosts survival in lupus nephritis

Kidney transplant boosts survival in lupus nephritis

Patients with LN-ESRD have high mortality rates, Dr. April Jorge of Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, MA, noted in an email to Reuters Health.

"We found that among nearly all such patients in the US who were waitlisted, renal transplant was associated with a significant survival benefit," she said. "This is an encouraging finding, and clinicians should consider early referral for renal transplantation for patients with LN-ESRD who may be candidates, as this can reduce mortality."

Resunab, a promising future treatment for lupus.

Resunab, a promising future treatment for lupus.

Patent holder Corbus Pharmaceuticals is putting the drug, branded Resunab, through its clinical paces.

Ajulemic acid (AJA, CT‐3, IP‐751, JBT‐101, anabasum) is a first‐in‐class, synthetic, orally active, cannabinoid‐derived drug that preferentially binds to the CB2 receptor and is non psychoactive.

In preclinical studies, and in Phase 1 and 2 clinical trials, AJA showed a favorable safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetic profile. It also demonstrated significant efficacy in preclinical models of inflammation and fibrosis.

Promising Screening Tools Assessed for Cognitive Dysfunction in SLE

Promising Screening Tools Assessed for Cognitive Dysfunction in SLE

The Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) questionnaire is an easy-to-administer, inexpensive, effective screening tool that can identify patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) who might be at risk for cognitive dysfunction (CD) and might benefit from additional neuropsychiatric assessment, according to data published in Lupus.

Recurrent lupus nephritis less frequent after kidney transplant

Recurrent lupus nephritis less frequent after kidney transplant

Lupus nephritis is recurring less frequently among patients with end-stage renal disease who undergo kidney transplant, possibly due to improved immunosuppression, according to data presented by Debendra N. Pattanaik, MBBS, MD, of the University of Tennessee Health Science Center.Lupus nephritis is recurring less frequently among patients with end-stage renal disease who undergo kidney transplant, possibly due to improved immunosuppression, according to data presented by Debendra N. Pattanaik, MBBS, MD, of the University of Tennessee Health Science Center.

Lupus patients benefited from bioelectronic medicine treatment

Lupus patients benefited from bioelectronic medicine treatment

A pilot clinical trial showed that bioelectronic medicine treatment was effective in reducing fatigue and pain in lupus patients. The researchers also saw a decrease in arthritis. A pilot study is a small-scale preliminary study that examines the feasibility of an approach that researchers intend to use in a larger scale study.

Organs are not just bystanders, may be active participants in fighting autoimmune disease

Organs are not just bystanders, may be active participants in fighting autoimmune disease

Organs affected by autoimmune disease could be fighting back by "exhausting" immune cells that cause damage using methods similar to those used by cancer cells to escape detection, according to a study by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine published today in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.