Genetically engineered immune cells wipe out lupus in mice

Genetically engineered immune cells wipe out lupus in mice

Lupus can be a stubborn disease to treat. Although many struck by the autoimmune condition live relatively normal lives, some suffer from kidney failure, blood clots, and other complications that can be deadly. Now, scientists have found that a novel treatment that wipes out the immune system’s B cells cures mice of the condition. Though the work is preliminary, it has excited researchers because it uses a therapy already approved for people with blood cancer.

“This is a critical stepping stone,” says Jennifer Anolik, a rheumatologist who runs the lupus clinic at the University of Rochester Medical Center in New York who was not involved with the work.

New system for early detection of lupus developed

New system for early detection of lupus developed

Autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus or rheumatoid arthritis, are difficult to diagnose, specially in early stages. Specifically, in the case of lupus, specific antibodies aimed at antigens located in the nucleus of cells appear, including the anti-Ro/SSA. These anti-Ro/SSA antibodies can be found in the blood before other autoantibodies related with lupus, and can even be detected without the existence of symptoms.

Study Identifies Potential New Targets for Improving Heart Health in People with Lupus

Study Identifies Potential New Targets for Improving Heart Health in People with Lupus

People with lupus and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have a greater risk of developing cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and atherosclerosis. A new study conducted in Columbia has identified potential new therapeutic targets for reducing endothelial damage (defined as the destruction of the membrane that lines the inside of the heart and blood vessels).

Kidney transplant boosts survival in lupus nephritis

Kidney transplant boosts survival in lupus nephritis

Patients with LN-ESRD have high mortality rates, Dr. April Jorge of Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, MA, noted in an email to Reuters Health.

"We found that among nearly all such patients in the US who were waitlisted, renal transplant was associated with a significant survival benefit," she said. "This is an encouraging finding, and clinicians should consider early referral for renal transplantation for patients with LN-ESRD who may be candidates, as this can reduce mortality."

Rubella Immunity Lowers Over Time in Vaccinated Adolescents with Lupus

Rubella Immunity Lowers Over Time in Vaccinated Adolescents with Lupus

Vaccinated patients with highly active systemic lupus erythematosus seem to lose their immunity levels over time, a study in rubella-vaccinated adolescents suggests.

The study, “Risk factors associated with accelerated rubella-IgG antibody loss in previously vaccinated, treatment-naïve juvenile Systemic Lupus Erythematosus patients: a prospective study,” was published in the journal Arthritis & Rheumatology.

Resunab, a promising future treatment for lupus.

Resunab, a promising future treatment for lupus.

Patent holder Corbus Pharmaceuticals is putting the drug, branded Resunab, through its clinical paces.

Ajulemic acid (AJA, CT‐3, IP‐751, JBT‐101, anabasum) is a first‐in‐class, synthetic, orally active, cannabinoid‐derived drug that preferentially binds to the CB2 receptor and is non psychoactive.

In preclinical studies, and in Phase 1 and 2 clinical trials, AJA showed a favorable safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetic profile. It also demonstrated significant efficacy in preclinical models of inflammation and fibrosis.

Aerobic Exercise Improves Cardio Fitness Without Raising Inflammation

Aerobic Exercise Improves Cardio Fitness Without Raising Inflammation

Twelve weeks of aerobic exercise improved cardiovascular and respiratory fitness in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), but without positive changes in arterial stiffness that was this small study’s main goal.

Results also found no increase in signs of inflammation or oxidative stress in the exercise group compared to a control group urged to adopt a healthier lifestyle.

New Study Assesses Shingles Frequency in People Receiving CYC and Steroids

New Study Assesses Shingles Frequency in People Receiving CYC and Steroids

People who have lupus and systemic vasculitis have weakened immune systems that are more susceptible to infections. Side effects of medication intended to help manage these diseases, specifically steroids and chemotherapeutics, can weaken the immune system further.

Specifically, they are at an increased risk for varicella-zoster virus (VZV) reactivation. VZV is the virus, which can cause chickenpox (varicella) and shingles (zoster). Once a person recovers from chickenpox, VZV remains inactive in the body. VZV can reactivate and cause a painful rash called shingles. There are many reasons why the virus can reactivate.