You are in: Home > News & Events > Research News from Around the World

Research News from Around the World

Lupus News Links

News from Pennsylvania , USA:

Steroids, older age worsen Lupus damage. Despite significant improvements in treatment during recent decades, patients with systemic lupus erythematosus remain at risk for disease damage, particularly if they are older and use high-dose corticosteroids, a longitudinal study found.

(read more)
 

News from Canada:

Influence of ethnicity on childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus: Results from a multi-ethnic multicenter Canadian cohort.

(read more)
 

News from Canada:

Canadian Institute of Health Research. Research: Lupus drugs carry no significant cancer risk for patients

(read more)
 

News from USA:

Scientists at the Scripps Research Institute, USA, find a key element of lupus, suggesting better drug targets.

(read more)

News from Australia:

Two studies by researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center could lead to new treatments for lupus and other autoimmune diseases and strengthen therapies for viral, bacterial, and parasitic infections.

(read more)

News from Chicago, USA:

Patients with SLE had more sleep problems than the general US population, and psychosocial factors, particularly depression and anxiety, were associated with the abnormalities, according to recent study results from the University of Chicago Rheumatology clinic.

(read more)

News from USA:

Scientists at Yale University have designed and tested a drug delivery system that shows early promise for improved treatment of lupus and other chronic, uncured autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis and Type 1 diabetes

(read more)

News from Japan:

Osaka-based Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Limited and U.S. biotech Resolve Therapeutics, LLC have entered into a partnership to develop compounds for the treatment of lupus and other autoimmune diseases.

(read more)

News from Thailand:

Despite more than half of the cohort taking vitamin D supplements, 58% of Thai patients with SLE had vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency, according to recent study results by researchers in Thailand.

(read more)

News from Thailand:

Despite its prevalence, leukopenia typically was not persistent or a risk factor for severe infection among patients with SLE, according to recent study results by researchers in Thailand.

(read more)

News from New York, USA:

Hospital for Special Surgery, New York City receives grant for new genomics center to study autoimmune diseases.

(read more)

News from Ohio, USA:

Suspecting that there may be unidentified mechanisms at work that make lupus a greater risk factor for heart disease than smoking, two researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center are capturing images of a beating heart during a lupus “flare” to help solve the mystery

(read more)

News from USA:

BioTrends Research Group, one of the world’s leading research and advisory firms for pharmaceutical and healthcare issues, has found that the top five unmet needs for new systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) therapies are long-term safety, reduction in disease activity/flares, sustained efficacy, successful trial in lupus patients, and steroid-sparing benefits. Surveyed rheumatologists in the United States indicate that a steroid-sparing effect is an important benefit in a new drug for SLE based on their concerns about long-term steroid use.

(read more)

News from Ireland:

Researchers from the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI) have discovered that a new treatment for SLE could potentially benefit Irish patients who suffer from the condition:

(read more)

News from Turkey:

Psychologically, SLE has been shown to be associated with higher rates of mental illness, and specifically, mood issues. However, no research has looked at the rates of mood issues and personality problems in a sample of individuals with SLE compared to those without. To fill this void in clinical research, Faruk Uguz, Associate Professor of the Department of Psychiatry at the Meram Faculty of Medicine at Konya University in Turkey recently led a study involving 60 individuals without SLE and 45 individuals with SLE.

(read more)

News from France:

A clinical trial with 149 patients suffering from systemic lupus, has shown the effectiveness of a synthetic peptide developed by a team of researchers led by CNRS biologist Slyviane Muller at the Institut de Biologie Moleculaire (IBMC) in Strasbourg, France.

(read more)

News from France:

University of Louisville School of Medicine Researchers identify gene variants that may cause kidney problems in lupus patients

(read more)

News from Germany:

Scientists of the University Hospital Bonn, Germany have now discovered which signaling pathway of the innate immune system promotes autoimmune symptoms following sun-induced DNA damage.

(read more)

News from Kansas, USA:

Researchers have found a link between the hormone, estrogen and the development of the disease.

(read more)

A second clinical trial of abatacept has failed to demonstrate improved outcomes in patients with lupus nephritis.:

(read more)

News from Saint Louis University, USA :

SLU Researchers Win NIH Grant to Study Lupus

ST. LOUIS - Two researchers at Saint Louis University's division of rheumatology in the department of internal medicine have been awarded a $1.8 million NIH grant to study the physiological and biochemical functions in lupus, an autoimmune disease, and develop possible new medications for its treatment. Lupus, a chronic inflammatory disease, occurs when the body's immune system produces antibodies that attack its own tissues and organs, and affects different parts of the body including kidneys, blood cells, brain, heart and lungs. Terry Moore, M.D., director of rheumatology and Anil Chauhan, Ph.D., associate professor in the division of rheumatology at SLU will study and evaluate the role of T-cells and immune complexes in the disease, and how they generate inflammatory responses.

(read more)
 

News from Washington, USA :

Survival rates for lupus patients improved from 1970-2011

WASHINGTON — Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus improved their 10-year survival rates during a 41-year period despite demographic changes, according to data presented at the American College of Rheumatology Annual Meeting.

Researchers in Boston studied 1,099 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) who were part of a lupus registry. Age at SLE diagnosis, history of lupus nephritis, serologies, hematology and renal laboratories, medication use and date of death were gathered from medical records. Patients were followed for 10 years, until death or until April 30, 2011 when follow-up ended. To estimate the risk for death over time and to investigate potential mortality predictors, researchers used Kaplan-Meier survival curves with log rank tests and multivariable Cox proportional hazards models, adjusted for age at diagnosis, race, sex, nephritis and hydroxychloroquine use.

(read more)
 

News from the USA:

Women with lupus have a higher risk for pre-eclampsia

New research reports that women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have a two-fold increase in risk of preeclampsia—a dangerous condition in which pregnant women develop high blood pressure (hypertension) and protein in their urine (proteinuria) after 20 weeks of gestation. According to the findings published in Arthritis Care & Research, a journal of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR), use of Disease-Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs (DMARDs) during pregnancy was rare in the study population, but women who did use these medications show a statistically non-significant increase in preeclampsia risk. The risk could be explained by the severity of autoimmune disease among DMARD users.

(read more)
 

News from the USA: 

Potential new Lupus therapy - Rontalizumab

Research over the last several years has found that in some patients with lupus, there is increased production of interferon-alpha. This molecule activates some genes which control the production of inflammatory proteins. This so-called “interferon signature” has been considered, therefore, a potentially modifiable pathway in the efforts to treat lupus. Rontalizumab is such a drug and may benefit people with lupus.

(read more)

 

News from the Australia: 

$80,000au boost for autoimmune researcher

More than 30 years ago while studying to be a veterinarian, Chris Goodnow became fascinated with autoimmune diseases.
The interest was cemented when his mother was diagnosed with lupus.

(read more)

 

News from the USA: 

New Phase 2 Study Tests Investigational Ointment for Discoid Lupus

A new study called SKINDLE will test an experimental skin ointment for active skin lesions caused by Discoid or Systemic Lupus Erythematosus. The drug, called R333, is a potent, topical JAK and SYK inhibitor with the potential to prevent or diminish both acute and chronic phases of this disorder. DLE is a chronic skin condition of sores with inflammation and scarring favoring the face, ears, and scalp and at times on other body areas.

(read more)